My Story:

Every Thursday since Zach Pierson moved back to Cincinnati in the summer of 2008, with only a handful of exceptions, he has made a point of having lunch with his paternal grandfather, his only living grandparent, Ben Pierson, who as of this writing is 99 years old.

“He has a girlfriend he met at the retirement home,” Zach says. “He likes to talk about how he bagged a young one. She is in her 80s and has dementia. He won’t let me bring him anything to eat. I guess it’s one of the highlights of his week when I come to visit, depending on how bingo went the night before. When it’s time to get back to work, he probably tells me, ‘Goodbye, thanks for coming,’ a dozen times.

“If spending a small bit of my week is enough to make his day, I’m going to do it. I believe in looking ahead, doing whatever it takes to avoid having regrets.”

Zach grew up in Blue Ash and played baseball for Sycamore High, as well as for the club team at Ohio State University. He says he fell in with the right crowd growing up. He remembers his T-ball coach telling him he was the only kid he knew who read the sports page.

Zach’s father, Lynn, began his career with Chase Bank on Wall Street, then, realized he didn’t like banking. He went back to school, got his PhD, and became a clinical psychologist. Zach was born the day after his dad defended his dissertation at the University of Iowa.

“He was on a course to make millions of dollars at the expense of being fulfilled, making a big corporation richer without getting any satisfaction himself,” says Zach, who clearly is proud of the decision his father made. “Anything I took an interest in, he was very good about continuing the conversation.”

Zach’s mother, Pam, is a reading and math specialist, tutoring kids in the K-6 range. She has been working with children from a variety of schools, but primarily at Seven Hills, for 20-plus years.

Zach is deliberate in his approach to life. One day, he looked around and noticed his friends were starting to get married, having children. He decided it was time he took the next step. He remembers having a party on Labor Day at his apartment at a new complex on the Ohio River, called, The Banks. There he was, telling some funny story, and a young woman he hadn’t met smiled. Her name turned out to be Molly. Their first date was in October. He bought her a ring in November, and they married in August 2012. Zach and Molly reside in Blue Ash with their daughter, Sloane, and their Rhodesian Ridgeback, a rescue dog named, Bear, that Molly brought into their union.

Zach brings traits he learned from his parents to his work at the firm – an ability to listen, a desire to make a difference. “I love my work. This is such a dynamic industry. Best part is, I’m at a firm built on values that coincide with my own – doing the right thing for our clients and having integrity in everything you do.”